What’s the Big Deal if I Crack My Own Spine? – Stop Everyday Pain

What’s the Big Deal if I Crack My Own Spine? – Stop Everyday Pain

Is this you when your back feels stiff?  Looking for relief from stiffness or pain by twisting it out?  Hoping for that crack that feels like what you get from your chiropractor?  It’s not the same.  It’s more dangerous to do this yourself and you should learn about why this is.

 

Read more from the original post and early book excerpt by following the link below: “When the jammed-up joints are properly released, then the hyper-mobile joints – the ones that are cracking all the time – should not feel the need to do so much of the work anymore”

It might be that you’re noticing cracks and pops with regular daily movement or you are making your joints do this repeatedly throughout the day in the hopes for relief from pressure.  In both cases you should learn more about what’s really going on, so you make informed choices…

Source: What’s the Big Deal if I Crack My Own Spine? – Stop Everyday Pain

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Your Pain is Not Because You’re “Fat”

Your Pain is Not Because You’re “Fat”

What do I know about the struggle to lose weight? Not much and I don’t pretend to. That is a genetic “crap shoot” that I came out on the lucky side of.

What I DO know is that pain does not happen to overweight people alone.

The other thing I know and hear about more often than I should, is how doctors of all specialties commonly and unabashedly display extreme prejudice against people who are overweight.  Numerous patients of mine tell me similar stories about reaching out for help with their pain and being met with a host of physician encounters that leave them feeling judged and ashamed.  So many doctors are quick to blame the weight and slow to investigate past the fat.

Anyone in this day and age knows about the correlation between obesity and disease and mortality.  I’ll go out on a limb here and suggest that the majority of overweight patients know that it’s not ideal to be on the heavy side.  The last thing they need to hear is that everything wrong with them is because of their weight. First of all, that’s just not always true and more importantly, blaming their weight is certainly not something they need a doctor’s help doing.

When has fat-shaming ever helped anyone make positive lasting change? Being judged by careless strangers is one thing but by your own healthcare provider is quite another and shouldn’t be allowed.

If someone has been steadily on the heavy side for the majority of their lifetime and there hasn’t been a sudden recent change in weight, then the skeleton – while perhaps stressed in ways that lighter people aren’t – has had years to adapt.  Our bodies are pretty amazing that way and given years to slowly get used to something, we just do.  The likelihood that suddenly the weight is the main problem is unlikely for this sort of scenario.
I see plenty of lean and “fit” looking people who just wake up one day in pain and have no idea why.  We don’t say to those people: “Well it’s obviously because you’re too skinny.  Come back and see me when you’ve gained some weight.”

Here’s another problematic drawing of parallels that seems to happen quite a bit…

Any sized woman who experiences a 9 month gain of pregnancy weight should never be compared with someone who is chronically overweight.  It is completely different. Not only do most overweight people not gain that quickly but they also aren’t experiencing the unique destabilizing and mechanically disorienting effects of massive hormonal and blood volume changes.

If weight is legitimately suspected as the cause for pain, then the last thing you should do as a doc is dismiss the patient with a sweeping prescription for exercise and calorie restriction when the more likely chronic weight-related risk is cardiovascular.  If anything, this person needs to have a heart health check first.

When a patient feels alienated from their physician due to the shame over their weight, it creates a dangerous  barrier to receiving true healthcare solutions.

I hear first-hand from patients that they will simply not return for care when they feel unfairly judged and dismissed and this can be more dangerous than the weight itself.

We do need to be clear with our patients about the facts:

But facts can be shared without judgment and blame. Higher body fat percentage is a real health risk. Abdominal fat is the worst. It predisposes us to higher levels of chronic inflammation which can manifest in many ways – not just through pain.  Evidence shows that it’s inflammation that is the huge risk factor and linked with a host of diseases.

Doctors and patients alike need to be aware of the cold hard fact that body fat percentage can be dangerously high in underweight, average weight and overweight people.  This is why everyone of absolutely any size, needs to avoid being sedentary, eliminate inflammatory foods and care for their stress levels and stress coping – all of which have been shown to play a role with inflammation which is the ultimate killer.

It’s never just the weight alone.

When there is pain, the pain chemistry needs to be addressed first and foremost.  Yes, fat cells contribute to inflammation which can stack the deck against us and cause pain, but every person’s situation is unique.  Look at the mechanics.  Consider individual body chemistry.  Inquire about psycho-social factors.  These are the inroads to better, more compassionate self-care which is where weight loss can begin if indeed that is appropriate for that patient.

We are emotional creatures first.  The physical body is a reflection of who we are.  All bodies need to be greeted with kindness and respect first before change can be made.


image credit: By Peter Paul Rubens – The Prado in Google Earth: Home – 7th level of zoom, JPEG compression quality: Photoshop 10., Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=22620913

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No, You Do NOT Need to Improve Yourself For the New Year

No, You Do NOT Need to Improve Yourself For the New Year

rogi__gorski_kotar__croatia_-_panoramioThere is nothing wrong with you.

When you start believing that you are not inherently bad or defective, that is when resolutions for change actually can have lasting effect.  All we ever need to do both in life and in health is to get out of our own way.  Eliminate the obstacles.  Like a log jam in the river – moving the logs is much easier than trying to push the river uphill.

It’s true that you might be more comfortable in your body if you exercise regularly or eat fewer inflammatory foods, but you are still a valuable human being regardless of what you choose to do about this.  If you see your intrinsic value, you would probably choose less punishing behavior, and less time would be wasted spinning in unproductive guilt when things don’t go exactly as you planned.

Letting go of the idea that there is anything “wrong” with who we are opens the door to making good choices.  Connecting with our value lets us put aside harsh judgement and shame over the choices we make when they are not ideal.

The self-improvement frenzy of the new year’s resolution tradition is dangerously destructive because it feeds all sorts of unhealthy thought patterns.  We all know that most of these “resolutions” don’t stick and it’s because they tend to be rooted in unrealistic expectations and stem from faulty assumptions that we are “broken” in some way.

There is nothing wrong with resolving to remember to do good and be good whatever “good” means to you, but please remember that goodness is a natural inclination.  So, really, you’d be resolving to be more of who you naturally are.  If anything, we should all take a moment to reflect on what is keeping us from letting our optimal potential and natural happiness surface.

When the attitudes shift from a place of self hatred to self love and acceptance the natural flow of wellness is allowed to resume.

Let’s embrace what is and who we are just as we are.  You don’t need improvement this year or any year. You are perfect just the way you are.

Now go do something healthy just for the love of it!


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What IS “Integrative” Healthcare?

What IS “Integrative” Healthcare?

By The U.S. Army (2012 Warrior Games) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

“Integrative medicine” is a term that has become very trendy in the health and wellness industry.  It’s an approach inspired by some of the leaders in the Functional Medicine movement.  As soon as it became evident that patients demand it which means there are big dollars at stake, even mainstream medicine is coming on board.  Cleveland Clinic has opened a dedicated wing for Integrative and Lifestyle Medicine  as has Johns Hopkins with their Integrative Medicine and Digestive Center.

So, what is it exactly?

It’s healthcare designed to treat the whole person (shocker). Many of us in the natural healthcare industry who have been practicing with this mindset for decades can’t help but roll our eyes a little bit at this “new” movement, but it is one to celebrate.

It feels to me like the general public is just catching up with how I’ve been living for most of my life personally, and now professionally for close to 25 years.  What we see in the integrative circles of healthcare is a coming-together of East and West, an acceptance of the interdependence of both sides.

“Integration” refers to the coordination of care between mainstream Western medicine and traditional or “alternative” methods including but not limited to acupuncture, chiropractic, massage therapy, yoga, meditation and other lifestyle modifications. You can find “Functional Medicine” on Wikipedia defined as: medical practice or treatments that focus on optimal functioning of the body and its organs, usually involving systems of holistic or alternative medicine.  

The functional medicine movement was started by a chiropractor with a PhD in biochemistry – Jeffrey Bland.  He bravely championed the long held old-world wisdom of viewing health and disease not as a linear process between one cause and one effect, but rather a complex symphony with multiple orchestral sections that all depend on each other for harmony.   Now people like Mark Hyman MD and a slew of others, straddling mainstream and traditional methods, have embraced this much needed common-sense approach.

Integration? Or Collaboration?

What we are seeing and hearing increasingly from numerous medical centers and hospitals, as many of them move to offer these kinds of approaches under one roof, is validation of this kind of wisdom-medicine for use in the Western model.

This week’s national news headlines on ABC’s GMA morning programming included a story highlighting the benefits of integrative medicine for cancer patients at all stages of care.  The use of acupuncture, movement therapy like yoga, massage and meditation were given as examples of treatment methods used to address the emotional, spiritual and physical needs together.

Some of you who follow this blog know that, just a few weeks ago, I attended a conference held by the Academy of Integrative Health and Medicine (AIHM) where I met medical doctors, physician assistants, nurses, naturopaths, acupuncturists and other chiropractors.  All of us together acknowledging the role of each other’s specialties in the full care of a patient while remembering to also live the path that we advocate for by indulging in some reflective self care.

In conversation with someone over breakfast at this AIHM conference I shared that I am a chiropractor in solo practice. I was met with “So you don’t actually practice integrative medicine…”

This took me aback a bit because I believe I actually do the ultimate integrative practice.   This exchange made me consider that perhaps the confusion is with the concept of “collaborative” vs. “integrative”.  Solo practice means I run a one-woman-show but does not preclude my patients from receiving collaborative (or “integrative”) care.  In my opinion collaboration is essential to integrative approaches.

This meeting of two worlds, in my opinion, can happen just as effectively in a more expansive community setting and not just under one roof. Successful collaborative care for the whole person is much more about the attitudes of providers than a physical facility with a name. I see my job as more of a healthcare traffic cop of sorts.

With the training that every chiropractor receives – to serve as a primary / portal of entry provider  – we are charged with the responsibility of knowing when chiropractic will serve our patients and when other modalities are more appropriate or needed in conjunction with our work.  Who better then, to assess and help patients prioritize treatment methods and direct them to the right practitioners?

I am extremely comfortable with my limitations as a practitioner and for true whole-person healthcare I think it’s essential to beware the delusion that any one of us can be everything to everyone.

For patients who don’t yet have a healthcare team, I regularly bring their attention to physiatry, physical therapy, massage, acupuncture, psychotherapy, and whenever needed, direct them back to their mainstream medical provider or any  number of medical specialists.

Do you have a healthcare team of alternative and mainstream providers?  Are you enjoying the integrative medicine movement?  You deserve to.  Status quo is changing.  Expect more.